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12:01pm April 20, 2014

Tumblr Troubles and Signing Off

Dear Readers—

I’ve had some Tumblr trouble today. While on my dashboard I had noticed that an individual called whigdestroyer had made an intemperant comment on a post from Questionable Advice that I had reposted. When I clicked on to see what on earth they were talking about - I found myself on a page that said -“don’t use tumblr” and then proceeded to log me out. When I tried to log back it - it refused to login. Only I after I took various measures, ran an anti-virus scan, changed my Tumblr password, used another browser etc. I was able to get back into my account where I promptly blocked whigdestroyer.

Naturally I find myself rather disconcerted by this and am rethinking whether I should use Tumblr at all. I’ve met some very nice people here on Tumblr, discovered some things that I had never thought about - but I think it might be a bit too open to disruption and hacking, and also a bit too much of a time sink.

So I bid all my Gentle Readers adieu and I will miss many of you-

Your Humble Servant,
etc.

4:44am April 20, 2014

arsenicinshell:

Steampunk photoshot by LittleBitLizbit

3:27am April 20, 2014

f**kyeahvintageillustration:

'A child's book of warriors' by William Canton; illustrated by Herbert Cole. Published 1907 by J.M. Dent & Sons, London.

See the complete book here.

3:26am April 20, 2014
questionableadvice:

~ Principles of Politeness, and of Knowing the World. By the late Lord Chesterfield. Methodified and digested under distinct Heads, With Additions, By the Rev. Dr. John Trusler: Containing Every Instruction necessary to complete the GENTLEMAN and MAN OF FASHION; to teach him a Knowledge of Life, and make him well received in all Companies, 1786via Internet Archive"If you love mufic, hear it; pay fiddlers to play to you, but never fiddle yourfelf."

questionableadvice:

~ Principles of Politeness, and of Knowing the World. By the late Lord Chesterfield. Methodified and digested under distinct Heads, With Additions, By the Rev. Dr. John Trusler: Containing Every Instruction necessary to complete the GENTLEMAN and MAN OF FASHION; to teach him a Knowledge of Life, and make him well received in all Companies, 1786
via Internet Archive

"If you love mufic, hear it; pay fiddlers to play to you, but never fiddle yourfelf."

3:15am April 20, 2014

bookstorey:

Berthold Wolpe 


Next to T.S. Eliot, the name, arguably, most synonymous with publisher Faber & Faber is Bertold Wolpe (1905 – 1989): the German designer, typographer, calligrapher and illustrator, who between 1941 and 1975 designed over 1500 of their book covers and dust jackets.


Historical events would shape his career in two important ways: Firstly, the rise of fascism in Germany meant that, as a Jew, Wolpe was left with little choice but to leave his homeland for England in 1935 after being told by the Reich Culture Chamber that: "as you are Non-Aryan and as such do not possess the necessary reliability to create a spread of German cultural values, I forbid you to further practise your profession as a graphic designer." Secondly, the outbreak of World War II brought with it the need for austerity and Wolpe’s answer was to create for Faber his distinctive minimal designs, based heavily - and often exclusively – on his own calligraphy and typography.


As it turned out, Wolpe’s cultural influence - and not just on book design - would spread far more successfully in England, and beyond, than the Third Reich’s. His most well-known font, Albertus, that was modeled to resemble letters carved into bronze and named after Albertus Magnus, the thirteenth-century German philosopher and theologian, was adopted by the City of London, where it can still be found on many street name signs. It was also used as the typeface for the "Dawn Of Man" title card in Stanley Kubrick's film 2001: A Space Odyssey.


Other typefaces Wolpe designed included: Hyperion (1932), Tempest Titling (1935), Sachsenwald (1938), Pegasus (1938-9), Decorata (1955) and LTB Italic (1973). In his lifetime he became a Royal Designer for Industry in 1959, was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Royal College of Art in 1968 and appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1983. Wolpe’s work also merited a retrospective exhibition of his career at the V&A museum in 1980.


The photographs of The Camels Must Go and Introducing James Joyce show variations of Wolpe’s Albertus font, whilst When all is Done is an example of his hand drawn calligraphy. All books were published by wearefaber.


For further book scraps, please follow on Twitter.

3:14am April 20, 2014
books0977:

Kate Moss with books by Drew Jarrett for Allure, February 1997.
"For the 23-year old model, reading is a habit honed in airports; collecting first editions is a recently acquired kick. Here, browsing in the Quinto bookshop. Silk chiffon beaded top by Marc Jacobs. Viscose and wool pants by Ann Demeulemeester." 

books0977:

Kate Moss with books by Drew Jarrett for Allure, February 1997.

"For the 23-year old model, reading is a habit honed in airports; collecting first editions is a recently acquired kick. Here, browsing in the Quinto bookshop. Silk chiffon beaded top by Marc Jacobs. Viscose and wool pants by Ann Demeulemeester." 

9:08pm April 19, 2014

aneternalscoutandabrownie:

jamesmdavisson:

So far, I have been enjoying the Adventures of Business Cat a great deal, possibly more than is appropriate for an adult human. (All of these are from the webcomic Happy Jar)

UPDATE: Now with more Business.

YES ALL THE BUSINESS CAT STRIPS IN ONE PLACE

9:00pm April 19, 2014
deutschemark:

viktor-sbor:

"Портрет принца Альберта"1843 г
Франц Ксавер Винтерхальтер (1805-1873)

Prince Albert, by Franz Xaver Winterhalter

deutschemark:

viktor-sbor:

"Портрет принца Альберта"1843 г

Франц Ксавер Винтерхальтер
(1805-1873)

Prince Albert, by Franz Xaver Winterhalter

8:57pm April 19, 2014

silverbooklamp:

bookstorey:

The Strand Magazine and Sherlock Holmes


The Strand Magazine (1891-1950) cannot claim to have been the first to publish one of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories (his debut appearance was in A Study in Scarlet, in Beeton’s Christmas Annual for 1887, whilst a second story, The Sign of the Four, appeared in Lippincott’s Magazine in 1890), but with its publication of A Scandal in Bohemia in July 1891, it made the detective and his creator household names and turned and the magazine into a publishing sensation.


Launched at a time when British magazines where floundering in the face of competition from American titles, such as Harpers and Scribners, its founder, George Newnes (1851 - 1910), wanted to launch a new kind of magazine that would appeal to a growing middle and working-class readership who had more leisure time and disposable income than previous generations. Newnes’ vision was for a magazine that had  a "picture on every page", a good mix of fiction and non-fiction and a price that undercut the opposition. With the help of Conan Doyle, the format of the stories also differed from its rivals. Conan Doyle observed that neither one off stories or long running serials, where missing one issue might mean losing the thread of the plot entirely, were particularly successful in retaining reader loyalty. His solution was to have a single character running through a succession of more self-contained stories. Of his format he stated: “I believe that I was the first to realise this, and “The Strand Magazine” the first to put it into practice.”


The magazine was also responsible for creating the iconic image of Holmes with his deerstalker cap and Inverness cape. These details were never mentioned in Conan Doyle’s writing and came from the imagination of the illustrator commissioned to create the pictures for the Sherlock Holmes stories, Sidney Paget.


The success of Sherlock Holmes and The Strand reached its peak in 1901 with the serialisation of The Hound of the Baskervilles, which saw readers lining up outside the magazine’s offices, impatient to get their hands on the next instalment. Conan Doyle was not, however, the only writer of merit to feature extensively within The Strand’s pages. Other contributors included E. Nesbit, Jerome K Jerome, Rudyard Kipling, and H.G. Wells. P.G. Wodehouse, alone, contributed in excess of 150 stories.


The leather bound book in the photographs contains six issues of The Strand Magazine between Jan-June 1906. Whilst it, sadly, does not contain any Sherlock Holmes adventures, it does have stories from PG. Wodehouse, E Nesbit and Rudyard Kipling, as well as ones of Conan Doyle’s other, less well known, creation, Sir Nigel.


For further book scraps, please follow on Twitter.

And today you can find E-book copies of issues of The Strand Magazine.

8:49pm April 19, 2014
stormtrooperfashion:

Julia Veilex and Hannah Schwaerzer by Semih Kanmaz for Cosmopolitan Turkey, April 2014

Julia Veilex by Semih Kanmaz

stormtrooperfashion:

Julia Veilex and Hannah Schwaerzer by Semih Kanmaz for Cosmopolitan Turkey, April 2014

Julia Veilex by Semih Kanmaz

7:58pm April 19, 2014
jeannepompadour:

Queen Caroline by Godfrey Kneller, early 18th century

jeannepompadour:

Queen Caroline by Godfrey Kneller, early 18th century