My Ear-Trumpet Has Been Struck By Lightning

Jul 22

books0977:

The Prince and Betty. P. G. Wodehouse. New York: W. J. Watt & Company, 1912. First edition.
The original story tells of how unscrupulous millionaire Benjamin Scobell decides to build a casino on the small Mediterranean island of Mervo, dragging in the unwitting heir to the throne to help. Little does he know that his stepdaughter Betty has history with the young man John Maude, and his schemes lead to a rift between the newly reunited pair. Some changes were made to the US version.

books0977:

The Prince and Betty. P. G. Wodehouse. New York: W. J. Watt & Company, 1912. First edition.

The original story tells of how unscrupulous millionaire Benjamin Scobell decides to build a casino on the small Mediterranean island of Mervo, dragging in the unwitting heir to the throne to help. Little does he know that his stepdaughter Betty has history with the young man John Maude, and his schemes lead to a rift between the newly reunited pair. Some changes were made to the US version.

Jul 20

obsidian-sphere:

Happy National Ice Cream Day.

Merrill’s Ice Cream Mixture (1901)

obsidian-sphere:

Happy National Ice Cream Day.

Merrill’s Ice Cream Mixture (1901)

deutschemark:

Coronation of Ferdinand V, King of Bohemia (I of Austria) in St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague - 1836 - watercolor - Albertina, Vienna
It was the last time a Bohemian coronation was held.

deutschemark:

Coronation of Ferdinand V, King of Bohemia (I of Austria) in St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague - 1836 - watercolor - Albertina, Vienna

It was the last time a Bohemian coronation was held.

(via a-poet-and-other-things)

oldbookillustrations:

Fie, Mr. Fulton! Or shall we not think so badly of you?

T. S. Cheeseman, from The Cornhill magazine vol. 4 (January to June 1885), London.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Fie, Mr. Fulton! Or shall we not think so badly of you?

T. S. Cheeseman, from The Cornhill magazine vol. 4 (January to June 1885), London.

(Source: archive.org)

edwardianpromenade:

— Grete Reinwald with a cat (1910s), Edwardian postcard

edwardianpromenade:

— Grete Reinwald with a cat (1910s), Edwardian postcard

ladyattercop:

"A Fair Acrobat Soundly Thrashes A Man" (1898). He threatened her father; she "boxed [him] well about the head." -via Bob Nicholson

https://twitter.com/DigiVictorian/status/487610512830521344

ladyattercop:

"A Fair Acrobat Soundly Thrashes A Man" (1898). He threatened her father; she "boxed [him] well about the head." -via Bob Nicholson

https://twitter.com/DigiVictorian/status/487610512830521344

sydneyflapper:

Anna Ludmilla  (1903-1990). Premiere danseuse of the Chicago Opera Ballet in the 1920’s. Original signed photo, for sale here. 

sydneyflapper:

Anna Ludmilla  (1903-1990). Premiere danseuse of the Chicago Opera Ballet in the 1920’s. Original signed photo, for sale here

littleplasticthings:

The Roaring Twenties, 1939

littleplasticthings:

The Roaring Twenties, 1939

(via dfordoom)

saisonciel:

Ruth Vincent by Lallie Charles, 1890s

saisonciel:

Ruth Vincent by Lallie Charles, 1890s

(via thisisnotmyhomeplanet)

From a dear friend…

baptonbooks:

… and recent follower here, in fact.

image

“The fruit of the Eucharist is the participation of the body and blood of Christ. There is no sentence of Holy Scripture which saith that we cannot by this sacrament be made partakers of his body and blood except they be first contained in the sacrament, or the sacrament converted into them. “This is my body,” and “this is my blood,” being words of promise, sith we all agree that by the sacrament Christ doth really and truly in us perform his promise, why do we vainly trouble ourselves with so fierce contentions whether by consubstantiation, or else by transubstantiation the sacrament itself be first possessed with Christ, or no? A thing which no way can either further or hinder us howsoever it stand, because our participation of Christ in this sacrament dependeth on the co-operation of his omnipotent power which maketh it his body and blood to us, whether with change or without alteration of the element such as they imagine we need not greatly to care nor inquire.” — Richard Hooker on the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist, from his Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (Book V.67.6)

(Source: bookofcommonprayer)

fabula-unica:

"For three centuries the C. of E. taught the essentials of the Catholic Faith and ministered the essential Catholic Sacraments to the ordinary English people, when no one else could, or would have been allowed by the state to do. That is her title to exist, and I think a man could and should love her for that, even if he felt that he must leave her now." (from The Question of Anglican Orders, 1945)

Ran across this quotation from Dom Gregory Dix today, who has been much on my mind because of Corpus Christi yesterday. A fascinating way of looking at the subject—seeing the C of E less as agent of persecution and more as victim of persecution, which is very in line with Eamon Duffy’s research and writing for the last thirty years, pointing out that Catholicism in England was not so much driven out as driven underground, and that ordinary priests did the best they could with the hand they were dealt, and steadfastly brought God’s presence to the lives of their flock through all the winds of change. Duffy’s Voices of Morebath on this is particularly vivid, as is the closing chapter of The Stripping of the Altars