Theme
6:12am May 23, 2011
drakecaperton:

Wiener Magazin
October 1928
Cover by Manasse

drakecaperton:

Wiener Magazin

October 1928

Cover by Manasse

6:10am May 23, 2011
drakecaperton:

La fee du Printemps, by Fontan
La Vie Parisienne

drakecaperton:

La fee du Printemps, by Fontan

La Vie Parisienne

6:04am May 23, 2011
ratak-monodosico:

Ballerinas at barre against windows during rehearsal for Swan Lake at Grand Opera de Paris, by Alfred Eisenstaedt 1930 

ratak-monodosico:

Ballerinas at barre against windows during rehearsal for Swan Lake at Grand Opera de Paris, by Alfred Eisenstaedt 1930 

5:54am May 23, 2011
missfolly:

It’s little known that many artists earned a living illustrating for pulp fiction (books and magazines). Perhaps, had they illustrated for literary works, like Doré and Wyeth had, they would be well remembered.

missfolly:

It’s little known that many artists earned a living illustrating for pulp fiction (books and magazines). Perhaps, had they illustrated for literary works, like Doré and Wyeth had, they would be well remembered.

5:51am May 23, 2011
oldtimeycats:

Australian Fantasy 002 by peacay on Flickr.

oldtimeycats:

Australian Fantasy 002 by peacay on Flickr.

5:49am May 23, 2011

Little Marauders (1872)William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Little Marauders (1872)
William-Adolphe Bouguereau

5:47am May 23, 2011
thevictorianist:

The London sewerage system
During the early 19th century the River Thames was an open sewer, with disastrous consequences for public health in London, including numerous cholera epidemics. Proposals to modernise the sewerage system had been made during 1856, but were neglected due to lack of funds. However, after The Great Stink of 1858, Parliament realised the urgency of the problem and resolved to create a modern sewerage system.
Joseph Bazalgette, a civil engineer and Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Board of Works, was given responsibility for the work. He designed an extensive underground sewerage system that diverted waste to the Thames Estuary,  downstream of the main centre of population. Six main interceptory  sewers, totalling almost 100 miles (160 km) in length, were constructed,  some incorporating stretches of London’s ‘lost’ rivers.
Image: “The Octagon”, Crossness Pumping Station (opened 1865), architect Charles H. Driver

thevictorianist:

The London sewerage system

During the early 19th century the River Thames was an open sewer, with disastrous consequences for public health in London, including numerous cholera epidemics. Proposals to modernise the sewerage system had been made during 1856, but were neglected due to lack of funds. However, after The Great Stink of 1858, Parliament realised the urgency of the problem and resolved to create a modern sewerage system.

Joseph Bazalgette, a civil engineer and Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Board of Works, was given responsibility for the work. He designed an extensive underground sewerage system that diverted waste to the Thames Estuary, downstream of the main centre of population. Six main interceptory sewers, totalling almost 100 miles (160 km) in length, were constructed, some incorporating stretches of London’s ‘lost’ rivers.

Image: “The Octagon”, Crossness Pumping Station (opened 1865), architect Charles H. Driver

5:44am May 23, 2011
full-steam-ahead:

zipper dress by ~knightred21

I love zippers. If I could put zipper son everything I own, I would.

full-steam-ahead:

zipper dress by ~knightred21

I love zippers. If I could put zipper son everything I own, I would.

5:37am May 23, 2011
retrogasm:

Myrna Loy

retrogasm:

Myrna Loy

5:43pm May 22, 2011
Poster of Fantomas (1947)

Poster of Fantomas (1947)

5:40pm May 22, 2011
golden-age-movies:

Fantomas (1913)

golden-age-movies:

Fantomas (1913)