Theme
12:25am January 9, 2014

 Literary Comics

7:18pm October 12, 2013

“The purpose of literature is to turn blood into ink.”

— T.S. Eliot (via jaded-mandarin)
2:11am April 16, 2013

“No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be;
Am an attendant lord, one that will do
To swell a progress, start a scene or two,
Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool,
Deferential, glad to be of use,
Politic, cautious, and meticulous;
Full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse;
At times, indeed, almost ridiculous—
Almost, at times, the Fool.”

— from The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot. (via chazkeats)
12:09am February 13, 2013

 All My Pretty Ones: "Ash Wednesday" by T.S. Eliot

equalopportunityoggler:

I

Because I do not hope to turn again
Because I do not hope
Because I do not hope to turn
Desiring this man’s gift and that man’s scope
I no longer strive to strive towards such things
(Why should the aged eagle stretch its wings?)
Why should I mourn
The vanished power of the usual…

9:51pm January 16, 2013

fairest:

T.S. Eliot: Employee of the Month

Historian Russell Kirk, in his essential book on Eliot, Eliot and His Age (1971), writes that the publication and success of The Waste Land both changed, and didn’t change Eliot’s circumstances: “Like other poets before him, Eliot woke to find himself famous; but still he labored in the cellars of Lloyd’s bank.” And by referring to the cellar here, Kirk is not being metaphorical. The novelist Aldous Huxley visited Eliot at Lloyd’s and wrote: “(Eliot) was not on the ground floor nor even on the floor under that, but in a sub-sub-basement sitting at a desk which was in a row of desks with other bank clerks.”

3:26pm September 23, 2012

bookstorey:

Plays by T.S. Eliot


T.S. Eliot is one of the most revered English poets. He spent, however, much of the second half of his career writing plays composed entirely in verse, following in the tradition of Elizabethan and Jacobean playwrights he greatly admired, such as Shakespeare and John Webster. His reason for turning his hand to theatre was primarily to gain a wider audience: as he said a poet would like:


“to be something of a popular entertainer, and be able to think his own thoughts behind a tragic or a comic mask. He would like to convey the pleasures of poetry, not only to a larger audience, but to larger groups of people collectively; and the theatre is the best place in which to do it.”


Although two of his plays, Murder in the Cathedral and The Cocktail Party, enjoyed moderate critical and commercial success, they never achieved the same acclaim as his poetry; perhaps because they felt dated even in his own lifetime.


The books in the photographs are early editions published by Faber and Faber, where he also worked from 1925 till his death in 1965 and was responsible for publishing other notable poets including W. H Auden and Ted Hughes.

8:12pm September 16, 2012
readingmarksonreading:

     Pg. 529 of David Markson’s copy of The Web and the Rock by Thomas Wolfe:
     On which Markson has placed the beginnings of a bracketed line that will go on from this page until pg. 236 of the book, encompassing a section of the text featuring the character Seamus Malone.
—
     On this page, which is almost entirely marked in the margins by the line, Thomas Wolfe has Seamus Malone ranting about T. S. Eliot:     “‘Mr. Eliot from Missouri, has become a Royalist! A Royalist, if you please,’ choked Mr. Malone, ‘and an Anglo-Catholic!’”
     Earlier in the novel, Thomas Wolfe had written:     “—a royalist from Kansas City, a classicist from Nebraska, a fool from nowhere and from nothing.”     Which Richard S. Kennedy, in his book on Wolfe, The Window of Memory, said “is an unmistakable swing at Eliot.”
     Royalist!
     Anglo-Catholic!
     Classicist!
     In the preface to his own essay collection, For Lancelot Andrewes, Eliot himself claimed he was each of these three things:      “Classicist in literature, royalist in politics, and anglo-catholic in religion.”
     In Markson’s Reader’s Block we find:     “Anglican. Royalist. Classicist.”     Written on pg. 56.     Obvious reference to “Mr. Eliot from Missouri.”

readingmarksonreading:

     Pg. 529 of David Markson’s copy of The Web and the Rock by Thomas Wolfe:

     On which Markson has placed the beginnings of a bracketed line that will go on from this page until pg. 236 of the book, encompassing a section of the text featuring the character Seamus Malone.

     On this page, which is almost entirely marked in the margins by the line, Thomas Wolfe has Seamus Malone ranting about T. S. Eliot:
     “‘Mr. Eliot from Missouri, has become a Royalist! A Royalist, if you please,’ choked Mr. Malone, ‘and an Anglo-Catholic!’”

     Earlier in the novel, Thomas Wolfe had written:
     “—a royalist from Kansas City, a classicist from Nebraska, a fool from nowhere and from nothing.”
     Which Richard S. Kennedy, in his book on Wolfe, The Window of Memory, said “is an unmistakable swing at Eliot.”

     Royalist!

     Anglo-Catholic!

     Classicist!

     In the preface to his own essay collection, For Lancelot Andrewes, Eliot himself claimed he was each of these three things:
     “Classicist in literature, royalist in politics, and anglo-catholic in religion.”

     In Markson’s Reader’s Block we find:
     “Anglican. Royalist. Classicist.”
     Written on pg. 56.
     Obvious reference to “Mr. Eliot from Missouri.”

11:36am December 4, 2011
jeeprobado:

T. S. Eliot en Love Beach, New Providence Island, Bahamas (1957)Foto de Slim Aarons

jeeprobado:

T. S. Eliot en Love Beach, New Providence Island, Bahamas (1957)
Foto de Slim Aarons

11:35am December 4, 2011
T.S. Eliot:  “Anxiety is the hand maiden of creativity.”

T.S. Eliot: “Anxiety is the hand maiden of creativity.”

3:04pm December 3, 2011

From ‘The Waste Land’

radicaltraditionalism:

What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow
Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man,  
You cannot say, or guess, for you know only
A heap of broken images, where the sun beats,
And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief,
And the dry stone no sound of water. Only
There is shadow under this red rock,  
(Come in under the shadow of this red rock),
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.

- T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land

8:33am January 1, 2010
lolerature:

THIS IZ TEH WAY TEH YEAR ENDZ
THIS IZ TEH WAY TEH YEAR ENDZ
THIS IZ TEH WAY TEH YEAR ENDZ

lolerature:

THIS IZ TEH WAY TEH YEAR ENDZ

THIS IZ TEH WAY TEH YEAR ENDZ

THIS IZ TEH WAY TEH YEAR ENDZ