Theme
1:36am April 17, 2014

The Victorian, and The Modern

mediumdensity:

I read a completely splendid thing today.

This an example of Victorian verse, by Adam Lindsay Gordon. It casts life as a virtuous, essentially good enterprise:

Life is mostly froth and bubble,
Two things stand like stone.
Kindness in another’s trouble,
Courage in your own. 

Kingsley Amis rewrote this to better suit our modern malaise:

Life is mainly grief and labour,
Two things get you through.
Chortling when it hits your neighbour,
Whingeing when it’s you.

2:48am March 21, 2014

“it occurred to me that I would like to be a poet. The chief qualification, I understand, is that you must be born.”

— Reginald’s Rubaiyat - Saki (HH Munro)
9:38pm November 7, 2013

I like to think (and
the sooner the better!)
of a cybernetic meadow
where mammals and computers
live together in mutually
programming harmony
like pure water
touching clear sky.

I like to think
(right now, please!)
of a cybernetic forest
filled with pines and electronics
where deer stroll peacefully
past computers
as if they were flowers
with spinning blossoms.

I like to think
(it has to be!)
of a cybernetic ecology
where we are free of our labors
and joined back to nature,
returned to our mammal
brothers and sisters,
and all watched over
by machines of loving grace.

— Richard Brautigan. All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace (1967) (via kabinessence)
6:56pm October 13, 2013

There is no frigate like a book.

poetryinprivate:

There is no Frigate like a Book  
To take us Lands away,  
Nor any Coursers like a Page  
Of prancing Poetry –   
This Traverse may the poorest take         
Without oppress of Toll –   
How frugal is the Chariot  
That bears a Human soul.

-Emily Dickinson

See http://thecarmelitelibrary.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/emily-dickinson-there-is-no-frigate.html

9:27pm July 26, 2013

“The book of my enemy has been remaindered
And I am pleased.
In vast quantities it has been remaindered
Like a van-load of counterfeit that has been seized
And sits in piles in a police warehouse,
My enemy’s much-prized effort sits in piles
In the kind of bookshop where remaindering occurs.
Great, square stacks of rejected books and, between them, aisles
One passes down reflecting on life’s vanities,
Pausing to remember all those thoughtful reviews
Lavished to no avail upon one’s enemy’s book —
For behold, here is that book
Among these ranks and banks of duds,
These ponderous and seeminly irreducible cairns
Of complete stiffs.”

— ‘The Book of my Enemy Has Been Remaindered’ - Clive James (via shimmer)
8:57pm July 4, 2013

maryelizbeth:

i love this man. i love his poetry. i love this poem most.

"Love Calls Us to the Things of This World" — Richard Wilbur

8:54pm July 4, 2013

baileyeverywhere:

Love Calls Us to the Things of This World
Richard Wilbur

The eyes open to a cry of pulleys,
And spirited from sleep, the astounded soul
Hangs for a moment bodiless and simple
As false dawn.
Outside the open window
The morning air is all awash with angels.

Some are in bed-sheets, some are in blouses,
Some are in smocks: but truly there they are.
Now they are rising together in calm swells
Of halcyon feeling, filling whatever they wear
With the deep joy of their impersonal breathing;

Now they are flying in place, conveying
The terrible speed of their omnipresence, moving
And staying like white water; and now of a sudden
They swoon down into so rapt a quiet
That nobody seems to be there.
The soul shrinks

From all that is about to remember,
From the punctual rape of every blessed day,
And cries,
“Oh, let there be nothing on earth but laundry,
Nothing but rosy hands in the rising steam
And clear dances done in the sight of heaven.”

Yet, as the sun acknowledges
With a warm look the world’s hunks and colors,
The soul descends once more in bitter love
To accept the waking body, saying now
In a changed voice as the man yawns and rises,

“Bring them down from their ruddy gallows;
Let there be clean linen for the backs of thieves;
Let lovers go fresh and sweet to be undone,
And the heaviest nuns walk in a pure floating
Of dark habits,
keeping their difficult balance.”

In his book The Ignatian Adventure, Kevin O’Brien, SJ, mentions a poem by Richard Wilbur in his discussion of the Contemplation to Attain the Love of God at the end of the Spiritual Exercises. Its title is “Love Calls Us to the Things of This World.” It’s about dwelling in the spiritual heights, but then, finally, coming back to earth to get the job done.

9:18pm May 13, 2013
sparklesdire:

George Herbert, “The Church-Porch”

sparklesdire:

George Herbert, “The Church-Porch”

4:57am May 5, 2013
thenorwoodbuilder:

Sherlock Holmes.  
Jorge Luis Borges
No salió de una madre ni supo de mayores.Idéntico es el caso de Adán y de Quijano.Está hecho de azar. Inmediato o cercanolo rigen los vaivenes de variables lectores.
No es un error pensar que nace en el momentoen que lo ve aquel otro que narrará su historiay que muere en cada eclipse de la memoriade quienes lo soñamos. Es más hueco que el viento.
Es casto. Nada sabe del amor. No ha querido.Ese hombre tan viril ha renunciado al artede amar. En Baker Street vive solo y aparte.Le es ajeno también ese otro arte, el olvido.
Lo soñó un irlandés, que no lo quiso nuncay que trató, nos dicen, de matarlo. Fue en vano.El hombre solitario prosigue, lupa en mano,su rara suerte discontinua de cosa trunca.
No tiene relaciones, pero no lo abandonala devoción del otro, que fue su evangelistay que de sus milagros ha dejado la lista.Vive de un modo cómodo: en tercera persona.
No baja más al baño. Tampoco visitabaese retiro Hamlet, que muere en Dinamarcaque no sabe casi nada de esa comarcade la espada y del mar, del arco y de la aljaba.
(Omnia sunt plena Jovis. De análoga maneradiremos de aquel justo que da nombre a los versosque su inconstante sombra recorre los diversosdominios en que ha sido parcelada la esfera.)
Atiza en el hogar las encendidas ramaso da muerte en los páramos a un perro del infierno.Ese alto caballero no sabe que es eterno.Resuelve naderías y repite epigramas.
Nos llega desde un Londres de gas y de neblinaun Londres que se sabe capital de un imperioque le interesa poco, de un Londres de misteriotranquilo, que no quiere sentir que ya declina.
No nos maravillemos. Después de la agonía,el hado o el azar (que son la misma cosa)depara a cada cual esa suerte curiosade ser ecos o formas que mueren cada día.
Que mueren hasta un día final en que el olvido,que es la meta común, nos olvide del todo.Antes que nos alcance juguemos con el lodode ser durante un tiempo, de ser y de haber sido.
Pensar de tarde en tarde en Sherlock Holmes es unade las buenas costumbres que nos quedan. La muertey la siesta son otras. También es nuestra suerteconvalecer en un jardín o mirar la luna.

thenorwoodbuilder:

Sherlock Holmes.  

Jorge Luis Borges

No salió de una madre ni supo de mayores.
Idéntico es el caso de Adán y de Quijano.
Está hecho de azar. Inmediato o cercano
lo rigen los vaivenes de variables lectores.

No es un error pensar que nace en el momento
en que lo ve aquel otro que narrará su historia
y que muere en cada eclipse de la memoria
de quienes lo soñamos. Es más hueco que el viento.

Es casto. Nada sabe del amor. No ha querido.
Ese hombre tan viril ha renunciado al arte
de amar. En Baker Street vive solo y aparte.
Le es ajeno también ese otro arte, el olvido.

Lo soñó un irlandés, que no lo quiso nunca
y que trató, nos dicen, de matarlo. Fue en vano.
El hombre solitario prosigue, lupa en mano,
su rara suerte discontinua de cosa trunca.

No tiene relaciones, pero no lo abandona
la devoción del otro, que fue su evangelista
y que de sus milagros ha dejado la lista.
Vive de un modo cómodo: en tercera persona.

No baja más al baño. Tampoco visitaba
ese retiro Hamlet, que muere en Dinamarca
que no sabe casi nada de esa comarca
de la espada y del mar, del arco y de la aljaba.

(Omnia sunt plena Jovis. De análoga manera
diremos de aquel justo que da nombre a los versos
que su inconstante sombra recorre los diversos
dominios en que ha sido parcelada la esfera.)

Atiza en el hogar las encendidas ramas
o da muerte en los páramos a un perro del infierno.
Ese alto caballero no sabe que es eterno.
Resuelve naderías y repite epigramas.

Nos llega desde un Londres de gas y de neblina
un Londres que se sabe capital de un imperio
que le interesa poco, de un Londres de misterio
tranquilo, que no quiere sentir que ya declina.

No nos maravillemos. Después de la agonía,
el hado o el azar (que son la misma cosa)
depara a cada cual esa suerte curiosa
de ser ecos o formas que mueren cada día.

Que mueren hasta un día final en que el olvido,
que es la meta común, nos olvide del todo.
Antes que nos alcance juguemos con el lodo
de ser durante un tiempo, de ser y de haber sido.

Pensar de tarde en tarde en Sherlock Holmes es una
de las buenas costumbres que nos quedan. La muerte
y la siesta son otras. También es nuestra suerte
convalecer en un jardín o mirar la luna.

10:32pm April 20, 2013

“AS kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies dráw fláme;
As tumbled over rim in roundy wells
Stones ring; like each tucked string tells, each hung bell’s
Bow swung finds tongue to fling out broad its name;
Each mortal thing does one thing and the same:
Deals out that being indoors each one dwells;
Selves—goes itself; myself it speaks and spells,
Crying Whát I do is me: for that I came.

Í say móre: the just man justices;
Kéeps gráce: thát keeps all his goings graces;
Acts in God’s eye what in God’s eye he is—
Chríst—for Christ plays in ten thousand places,
Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his
To the Father through the features of men’s faces.”

— Gerard Manley Hopkins (via thedappledthings)
9:34pm April 11, 2013

“My thoughts are all a case of knives,
Wounding my heart
With scatter’d smart,
As watring pots give flowers their lives.
Nothing their furie can controll,
While they do wound and prick my soul.”

— George Herbert, second stanza of “Affliction (IV)” (HT Anecdotal Evidence)
src
5:01am February 23, 2013

 THE GHOST OF POETRY FUTURE: Who the Hell Was Ern Malley?

theghostofpoetryfuture:

The Ern Malley Poetry Hoax

Ern Malley, en train

Ern Malley’, Sydney-Melbourne night express, 29 April 1941, Sun Photo Archive. The authenticity of this photograph cannot be guaranteed by Jacket magazine. It may be of the actor Iain Gardiner, from David Perry’s film ‘The Refracting Glasses’, 1992….